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Golden Wattle: The Australian national floral emblem

Golden Wattle

Golden Wattle: The Australian national floral emblem and its unique background

Australia’s wide range of fauna captivates locals’ or foreigners’ imaginations. The land down under has 24,000 native flora species in its abundance. One popular Australian flora species is the national flower of Australia, i.e., the Golden Wattle. It is the national floral emblem of Australia. This beautiful flora species blossoms in the Australian Spring, which begins in September.

The Golden Wattle comprises large, golden ball-shaped flowers that have bright-green sickle-shaped phyllodes that grow up to 14cm. The Golden Wattle can be a medium shrub of 4-8 metres or a small tree that is 10cm high. Australia’s national floral emblem is present in the Eastern Australian states of New South Wales, and Victoria, and the Southern state of South Australia. It grows at exceptional speed in a well-drained, sunny position, plus it is frost hardy and it will tolerate frosts up to -7 degrees and can tolerate droughts.

The Golden Wattle became the floral emblem of Australia in 1988. September 1, also known as Wattle Day, represents a new beginning as it is the 1st day of Spring. People have celebrated Wattle Day since 1899, before Australia became a federation.

The flower represents fresh growth, renewal, and a fresh beginning. The Golden Wattle is a part of the largest group of trees and shrubs in Australia, known as the Acacia genus. Golden Wattles are found in a wide range of habitats and regions across Australia.

The Golden Wattles grow fast but live for a short time period, that does not mean that they do not have any benefits. They are useful in establishing a garden, providing water, and providing protection from roaming animals. Australia’s indigenous people have used Golden Wattle trees and other wattles for food, medicine, weaponry, musical instruments, glues, dyes, perfumes, and ceremonial decoration.

 

By Neel

By MAGAZINEUP

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